Vici.org

Summary

Ancient Greek city.

Class:

  • City
  • visible
  • Location ± 0-5 m.
(see also PELAGIOS)

Identifiers:

Nearby

Aulis.temple of Artemis Aulideia

ruins of Artemis temple

Aulida, Artemision

Temple of Artemis. Aulis.

Aulida

Ancien port

Xeropolis

Xeropolis

Images

Surroundings (Panoramio)

Annotation

In Aulis accrding to  Homerus Achaean fleet gathered to set off for Ilion - All who have not since perished must remember as though it were yesterday or the day before, how the ships of the Achaeans were detained in Aulis when we were on our way hither to make war on Priam and the Trojans, and we round about a spring were offering to the immortals upon the holy altars hecatombs that bring fulfillment, beneath a fair plane-tree from whence flowed the bright water; then appeared a great portent: a serpent, blood-red on the back, terrible, whom the Olympian himself had sent forth to the light, glided from beneath the altar and darted to the plane-tree.1.

At this place the Euripus separates Euboea from Boeotia. On the right is the sanctuary of Mycalessian Demeter, and a little farther on is Aulis, said to have been named after the daughter of Ogygus. Here there is a temple of Artemis with two images of white marble; one carries torches, and the other is like to one shooting an arrow. The story is that when, in obedience to the soothsaying of Calchas, the Greeks were about to sacrifice Iphigeneia on the altar, the goddess substituted a deer to be the victim instead of her. They preserve in the temple what still survives of the plane-tree mentioned by Homer in the Iliad . The story is that the Greeks were kept at Aulis by contrary winds, and when suddenly a favouring breeze sprang up, each sacrificed to Artemis the victim he had to hand, female and male alike. From that time the rule has held good at Aulis that oil victims are permissible. There is also shown the spring, by which the plane-tree grew, and on a hill near by the bronze threshold of Agamemnon's tent.2.

 

See:

  1. Homerus, Ilias II.280
  2. Pausanias Description of Greece with an English Translation by W.H.S. Jones, Litt.D., and H.A. Ormerod, M.A., in 4 Volumes. Cambridge, MA, Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann Ltd. 1918.

 

References

  1. Homerus, Il. II.280ff
  2. Pausanias IX,19